Protecting Your Most Valuable Asset

The DCPP Has Accused Me of Inadequate Supervision. What Does That Mean?

Any parent will tell you that parenting is the most difficult job out there.  Every child is different, and each child presents unique personality traits, has different educational abilities, and may have special physical or emotional requirements.  In short, there is no “one size fits all” parenting strategy.  Although parents are usually doing their best, there are times that the New Jersey Department of Children Protection and Permanency will not agree that the parents are acting a child’s best interest.  One common allegation is that the parents are providing inadequate supervision for the children.


Any parent will tell you that parenting is the most difficult job out there.  Every child is different, and each child presents unique personality traits, has different educational abilities, and may have special physical or emotional requirements.  In short, there is no “one size fits all” parenting strategy.  Although parents are usually doing their best, there are times that the New Jersey Department of Children Protection and Permanency will not agree that the parents are acting a child’s best interest.  One common allegation is that the parents are providing inadequate supervision for the children.

Inadequate supervision is a legal term within the context of a DCPP case.  It means that the DCPP alleges that you have placed your children in a situation that requires judgment or actions requiring a level of maturity higher than the maturity, physical condition, or mental abilities that could reasonably be expected from your children.  Typical examples include leaving young children home alone, the parents being too intoxicated to care for the children even if the parents are physically present, leaving children with inappropriate caregivers, or leaving weapons unlocked and available to access from children.  Inadequate supervision is a type of neglect, and the DCPP could seek to remove your children from your home and your custody if they believe you are leaving your children with inadequate supervision.

When trying to determine whether you have left your children with inadequate supervision, the DCPP will examine a variety of factors.  The first inquiry, and likely the most important, is the age and developmental stage of the children.  The DCPP will want to assess whether the children are able to exercise sound judgment in case of emergency.  Another factor is whether the child’s physical condition allows him or her to protect and care for himself.  For example, if the children has a physical or mental handicap which makes it impossible for him or her to provide for his or her own care, that child’s physical condition would more easily result in an inadequate supervision finding.  The DCPP will also determine whether the child’s basic needs were being met. For example, was the child left with food, water, clothing appropriate for the weather conditions, and proper shelter?  Whether a child has been left with inadequate supervision is a fact-sensitive inquiry and these are just a few of the issues the DCPP will consider.

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We have extensive experience in working with parent and helping with DCPP cases.  Contact us today for a consultation to talk about your children and how we can help protect your rights.

Are you interested in seeking an annulment? If so, contact Williams Law Group, LLC right away. Our family law attorneys will review your case to determine if an annulment is an option. If it is, we will guide you through the process and ensure you make the best decisions for your future. Call our office at (908) 810-1083, email us at[email protected], or contact us through our confidential online form to schedule a consultation.  Download our free resource guide today.